Inflating a Dog Screenplay
Chapter 19: The Mysteries of the Jet Pump Revealed (in which Peter learns a lesson in fluid dynamics)
by Eric Kraft
Inflating a Dog on Film

The screen rights are available.
E-mail Alec ďNickĒ Rafter.

INT. ABOARD ARCINELLA, BELOW DECKS. Patti is fastidious about touching anything greasy.
PETER
(sighs)
Iíd better start bailing.
RASKOL
(through the porthole)
Bailing is for chumps.
Peter recognizes the voice at once, turns and looks.  Raskol is looking in through a porthole, grinning.
In another moment Raskol is down in the hold beside Peter and Patti.  He has a couple of lengths of garden hose, and in his hand he holds a small metal device. 
RASKOL (CONTíD.)
(showing the device)
If you knew enough about old boats to know what to pray for, this would be the answer to your prayers.
It is a length of tubing, threaded at both ends, with an opening at one side.
PETER
What is it?
RASKOL
Itís a jet pump.
Peter looks at it carefully.
PETER
It doesnít have any moving parts.  How can it be a pump?
RASKOL
Give it here.
Raskol goes to work.  He connects a garden hose to either end of the jet pump.  He runs one through the hatch and into the river.  The other he attaches to a faucet on the dock.  Then he turns the water on.
PETER
Youíre putting her out of her misery?
RASKOL
(soberly)
Nope.  Iím bailing her out.
PETER
By filling her up?
RASKOL
Come here.
He leads Patti and Peter onto the foredeck.  He bends over and pulls the end of the other garden hose from the dark river.  Water is rushing from it.
RASKOL (CONTíD.)
(dropping it in again)
Now come below.
Below, he lifts the pump from the bilge and holds it so that the opening is just at the surface of the bilgewater.  We can hear, and even see, the bilgewater being sucked into the opening and out into the river.
PATTI
What a little sucker!
PETER
Thatís amazing!  How does it work?
RASKOL
(drily)
Very well.
PETER
But I mean, what makes it work?
RASKOL
I donít know.  Itís one of the great mysteries of life.
CUT TO:
INT. ON THE SCREEN OF 1957 BLACK-AND-WHITE TV. The set of the ďSaturday ScienceĒ show.  DOCTOR SCIENCE is a cross between Bozo the Clown and Albert Einstein.
ANNOUNCERíS VOICE
Hey, kids! hereís the man with the atomic brain, Doctor Science!
DOCTOR SCIENCE
(wildly enthusiastic)
Today is fluid dynamics day! 
(blows across a piece of paper, which rises)
See that?  The paper rises when I blow across it!  Why the heck did that happen?  Blowing lowered the pressure above the paper, and the greater pressure below the paper pushed it up.  Thatís Bernoulliís principle!
(a picture of Bernoulli)
An airplaneís wing works the same way!
Airflow
From one point of view, the wing is pushed up by the greater pressure below it, but from another point of view it is sucked up by the lower pressure above it.  Both are valid explanations! .†.†. But perhaps you disagree.  Perhaps you think Iím just ďplaying with words.Ē  Ha!  Take a look at this.
(displays this apparatus)
apparatus
I blow into this tube .†.†.
(blows into left tube)
The balloon inflates, of course.
(allows it to deflate)
Now .†.†. I suck on the other tube.
(he does) 
And the balloon still inflates.  So, sucking is the same as blowing!
(shows a portrait of physicist G. B. Venturi)
Enter G. B. Venturi, Italian physicist, who discovered that the speed of a fluid flowing through a tube could be accelerated by introducing a tapering constriction into the flow path.  Wow!
(an animated diagram)
jet pump
Bernoulliís principle tells us that Venturiís constriction will lower the fluid pressure, since an increase in velocity must lead to a decrease in pressure, and thatís how a jet pump works!  Water from an outside source enters under pressure.  As it passes through the throat section, its velocity increases and its pressure decreases.  Then, depending on your point of view, the lower pressure within the throat section sucks or the greater pressure outside the pump blows water from the bilge into the extractor inlet.  Finally, the drive water and the bilge water shoot out the other side.
Peter reaches out to the knob and turns the TV off. He has been watching this at home.
PETER
Amazing.
CUT TO:
INFLATING A DOG SCREENPLAY | CONTENTS | CHAPTER 20

Candi Lee Manning and Alec "Nick" RafterHere are a couple of swell ideas from Eric Kraft's vivacious publicist, Candi Lee Manning.
 

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Copyright © 2001 by Eric Kraft
Registered with the Writers Guild of America East in 2001 

The screenplay for Inflating a Dog is a work of fiction. The characters, incidents, dialogues, settings, and businesses portrayed in it are products of the authorís imagination and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to actual events or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental. 

All rights reserved. No part of this teleplay may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the author. 

The illustration at the top of the page is an adaptation of an illustration by Stewart Rouse that first appeared on the cover of the August 1931 issue of Modern Mechanics and Inventions. The boy at the controls of the aerocycle doesnít particularly resemble Peter Leroyóexcept, perhaps, for the smile.

 
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